Editor’s note: We’ve  spotted a couple of  News Feed updates from Facebook in February 2016 and wanted to share these with you. Anything you’d like to add to this post? Let us know in the comments below or drop us a tweet

February 2016: Facebook Reactions

Update February 24, 2016:  Facebook recently rolled out Reactions – their supercharged ‘like’ button. Initially, just as they do when someone likes a post, if someone uses a Reaction, Facebook will infer they want to see more of that type of post.

Here’s more from their recent announcement:

In the beginning, it won’t matter if someone likes, “wows” or “sads” a post — we will initially use any Reaction similar to a Like to infer that you want to see more of that type of content. Over time we hope to learn how the different Reactions should be weighted differently by News Feed to do a better job of showing everyone the stories they most want to see.

If you’re interested to find out more about Facebook Reactions you can find all the details here.

February 2016: Relevant stories

Update February 1, 2016: Through research, Facebook found that people reported having a better News Feed experience when the stories they see at the top are stories they are both likely to rate highly if asked and likely to engage with.

As such, Facebook are making an update to News Feed that combines these two signals. The News Feed will begin to look at both the probability that someone would want to see the story at the top of their feed and the probability that they will like, comment on, click or share a story.

Facebook will start to rank stories higher in feed which they think people might take action on, and which people might want to see near the top of their News Feed.

How may this affect your page?

In their blog post announcing this change, Facebook explain:

In general this update should not impact reach or referral traffic meaningfully for the majority of Pages; however, some Pages may see some increases in referral traffic, and some Pages may see some declines in referral traffic. Pages might see some declines in referral traffic if the rate at which their stories are clicked on does not match how much people report wanting to see those stories near the top of their News Feed. This update helps rebalance those two factors, so people are seeing relevant stories to them.

Facebook also recommends that Pages should avoid encouraging people to take an action (such as encouraging lots of clicks), because this will likely only cause temporary spikes in metrics that might then be rebalanced by feed’s ranking over time.

July 2015: Greater user control over the News Feed

Update July 9, 2015: In an update that’s first arrived on iOS (and coming soon to all mobile and web), Facebook is making it easier for people to adjust and customize their News Feed settings

The preferences tab will be more visible and more intuitive, allowing people to find pages and people to like and follow, and easily selecting to follow/unfollow certain content.

newsfeed_preferences_follow_unfollow

June 2015: Time spent on stories

Update, June 12, 2015: How much time you spend viewing stories becomes a factor Facebook uses to determine what to show at the top of your News Feed.
The signals from content you spend more time with will help determine what appears higher in the News Feed, potentially having an effect on the visibility of content from Pages. Facebook explains:

“We’ve discovered that if people spend significantly more time on a particular story in News Feed than the majority of other stories they look at, this is a good sign that content was relevant to them.”

The social network does not expect Pages to see significant changes in distribution as a result of this update.

April 2015: Friends’ content prioritized

Update, April 21, 2015: Content posted by the friends you care about will appear higher in the News Feed
The content posted by your friends, items such as photos, videos, status updates or links, will appear higher in the News Feed, potentially having an effect on the visibility of content from Pages.

In addition, Facebook is updating the News Feed to lower the visibility of stories about friends liking or commenting on a post. And for those with less content in the News Feed, Facebook now allows content from the same source to appear in succession.

From VentureBeat:

Page owners might be worried how these updates will impact their reach and traffic. As Facebook explains, “the impact of these changes on your page’s distribution will vary considerably depending on the composition of your audience and your posting activity.” In other words, there’s no easy way to predict whether it will go up, stay flat, or go down.

March 2015: Facebook updates how Likes are counted

Update, March 5, 2015: Facebook to update the way Page likes are counted, removing the likes of memorialized accounts and deactivated accounts.

It’s possible that Page owners might see a small decline in the overall Likes for their page once this update occurs.

January 2015: Facebook targets hoaxes

Update, January 20, 2015: Facebook aims to reduce the number of hoaxes in News Feed with algorithm tweak.

To reduce the number of posts containing misleading or false news, Facebook has announced that the News Feed algorithm  will begin to factor in when many people flag a post as false or choose to delete posts.

You also might see these type of posts that Facebook deems misleading displayed with this warning:
news-feed-hoaxes

This algorithm tweak is designed to keep articles that many people have reported as a hoax or chosen to delete from getting widespread distribution in News Feed.

January 2015: Video is growing

Update, January 12, 2015: Facebook has provided some new stats and tips on using video, including these:

  • In just one year, the number of video posts per person has increased 75% globally and 94% in the US.
  • The amount of video from people and brands in the News Feed has increased 3.6x year-over-year.
  • Since June 2014, Facebook has averaged more than 1 billion video views every day.
  • On average, more than 50% of people who come to Facebook every day in the US watch at least one video daily.
  • 76% of people in the US who use Facebook say they tend to discover the videos they watch on Facebook.

Seems like a big clue that Facebook could be favoring video posts more highly!

November 2014: Overly promotional posts penalized

Update, November 14, 2014: Facebook will begin monitoring and reducing the appearance of overly promotional posts from Pages, beginning in January 2015. Overly promotional posts, according to Facebook, may include:

  1. Posts that solely push people to buy a product or install an app
  2. Posts that push people to enter promotions and sweepstakes with no real context
  3. Posts that reuse the exact same content from ads

Pages that post promotional creative should expect their organic distribution to fall significantly over time.

Here’s an example of a type of promotional post:

nf_1113_1

November 2014: More Newsfeed control

Update, November 7, 2014: Facebook users now have additional control options for choosing what they see in their news feed.  What’s particularly interesting about this is that you can now do the following:

“You can filter the view by people, Groups or Pages, or see them all at once.”

Here is how this looks inside the app:

choose news feed

November 2014: Post bundling

Update, November 6th 2014: Fans of a particular Facebook page may see that page’s posts bundled together in the News Feed, such that the user would need to click a link to see more from the page. This happens when there are multiple posts from the Page that could appear in the News Feed (e.g., if a Page publishes multiple posts in one day).

Note: We’re constantly refreshing this post. All information you read below is accurate and up-to-date as of November 6, 2014. 

Does this sound familiar: People have liked your Facebook page or followed your profile, and when you post a new update, less than 10 percent of your fans and followers ever see it.

It’s a challenge that many Facebook marketers face. How do you get your content seen on Facebook?

The secret is in understanding the Facebook News Feed and its mighty algorithm. The Facebook algorithm helps make sense of the huge number of potential stories and updates that could come our way, choosing updates to show in our News Feed based on a huge number of factors.

Here’s our solution: We want to help you understand how your updates get viewed on Facebook. So we’re collecting all the Facebook algorithm factors, updates, and changes that we can find and placing them here in this post for easy reference.

Read on, and see what goes into the complex, fascinating formulas of the Facebook News Feed.

facebook news feed

Note: This post will be updated with the latest Facebook algorithm news and changes as they happen. We’ll make a note up with for the latest date. Got something to add to this post? Let us know in the comments or by emailing hello@bufferapp.com.

The Overview of Facebook News Feed Factors

How does Facebook decide what to show in a News Feed? Here are the factors that may determine whether your post shows up or not.

Do this: The algorithm loves …

  • Posts with lots of comments
  • Posts with lots of likes
  • Post types that users seem to prefer more than others (e.g., photo, video, or status update)
  • Posts that reference a trending topic
  • Posts that receive a high volume of likes, comments, or shares in a short time
  • Link posts
  • Videos uploaded to Facebook that receive a large number of views or extended viewing duration
  • Posts that tag other pages within the text
  • Posts that are liked or commented on by one’s friends
  • Posts from pages that one interacts with often
  • Post types that one interacts with often
  • Posts from pages with complete profile information
  • Posts from pages where the fan base overlaps with the fan base of other known high-quality pages
  • Images and videos that have not previously appeared in the Open Graph
  • Links that have not been posted before

Don’t do this: The algorithm is not too keen on …

  • Clickbait
  • Frequently circulated content and repeated posts
  • Like-baiting
  • Posts that include spammy links
  • Text-only status updates from pages
  • Posts that are frequently hidden or reported (a sign of low quality)
  • Posts that contain the words “like, comment, or share”
  • Posts with unusual engagement patterns (a like-baiting signal)
  • Posts that receive negative feedback categorizes as “meme content”
  • Posts that are classified as memes by Facebook’s visual analysis of overlayed text on image
  • Passive fans of a particular Facebook page may see that page’s posts bundled together in the News Feed, such that the user would need to click a link to see more from the page.
  • Overly promotional content from pages—pushing people to buy an app or service, pushing people to enter a contest or sweepstakes, posts that reuse the same text from ads

Details: How Facebook decides what appears in a News Feed

The total number of comments and likes on a post impact visibility.

The post type—photo, video, or status update—impacts visibility.

The stories that show in your News Feed are influenced by your connections and activity on Facebook. This helps you to see more stories that interest you from friends you interact with the most. The number of comments and likes a post receives and what kind of story it is (ex: photo, video, status update) can also make it more likely to appear in your News Feed.

(source: Facebook, 2014)

Posts that reference a trending topic may receive higher visibility.

When a friend or Page you are connected to posts about something that is currently a hot topic of conversation on Facebook, that post is more likely to appear higher up in News Feed, so you can see it sooner.

Trending topics appear in the right sidebar of your Facebook News Feed. For timely posts, Facebook may show a “trending” notification at the top of the post.

facebook-trending

(source: Facebook, September 2014)

The timing of when likes, comments, and shares occur on a post impacts visibility.

Currently one of the signals we look at is the total number of likes that a post has received when determining how high up to to show it in News Feed. With this update, we are going to begin looking at when people are choosing to like, comment and share.

(source: Facebook, September 2014)

Clickbait drives down the visibility of a post.
Facebook will show fewer clickbait posts in the News Feed. A couple of ways they determine clickbait include:

  • If a user clicks through to a link and then comes straight back to Facebook
  • If a lot of people click on the link, but relatively few people click Like or comment on the story when they return to Facebook

(source: Facebook, August 2014)

Link posts receive preference over links shared in photo captions or status updates.

(source: Facebook, August 2014)

The views and viewing duration of videos uploaded to Facebook impact visibility.

This factor does not include videos shared from YouTube, Vimeo, or other sites.

(source: Facebook, June 2014)

Frequently circulated content and repeated posts are shown less.

There are occasionally instances where photos or videos are uploaded to Facebook over and over again. We’ve found that people tend to find these instances of repeated content less relevant, and are more likely to complain about the Pages that frequently post them. We are improving News Feed to de-emphasize these Pages.

(source: Facebook, April 2014)

Like-baiting posts are shown less.

like-baiting-screenshot

Like-baiting refers to posts explicitly asking users to take an action on the post like commenting, sharing, or liking. These posts tend to get greater engagement but Facebook users don’t associate these posts with quality.

(source: Facebook, April 2014)

Posts that include spammy links are shown less.

By measuring how frequently people on Facebook who visit a link choose to like the original post or share that post with their friends, we’ve been able to better detect spammy links.

(source: Facebook, April 2014)

Tagging other pages within a post may increase visibility.

br_howard-v2-1

When a Page tags another Page, we may show the post to some of the people who like or follow the tagged Page.

(source: Facebook, February 2014)

Text-only status updates from pages are shown less.

the latest update to News Feed ranking treats text status updates from Pages as a different category to text status updates from friends. We are learning that posts from Pages behave differently to posts from friends … Page admins can expect a decrease in the distribution of their text status updates, but they may see some increases in engagement and distribution for other story types.

(source: Facebook, January 2014)

Posts that are liked or commented on by friends may be shown more.

You see stories in your News Feed about your friends’ activity on Facebook, including when your friends like or comment on posts from people you’re not friends with.

You also might see stories in your News Feed about your friends liking or commenting in public groups that you’re not a member of.

(source: Facebook, 2014)

Related articles add an extra opportunity for visibility.

Soon, after you click on a link to an article, you may see up to three related articles directly below the News Feed post to help you discover more content you may find interesting.

(source: Facebook, December 2013)

4 factors that increase visibility:

  1. How often you interact with the friend, Page, or public figure (like an actor or journalist) who posted
  2. The number of likes, shares and comments a post receives from the world at large and from your friends in particular
  3. How much you have interacted with this type of post in the past
  4. Whether or not you and other people across Facebook are hiding or reporting a given post

In addition to these factors, Facebook also bumps older organic stories that people did not scroll down far enough to see the first time. These posts can reappear near the top of News Feed if they’re still getting lots of likes and comments.

(source: Facebook, August 2013)

3 elements of pages that may increase visibility:

  1. How frequently content from a certain Page is reported as low quality (e.g., hiding a Page post),
  2. How complete the Page profile is
  3. Whether the fan base for a particular Page overlaps with the fan base of other known high quality Pages

The article on Facebook claims that over 1,000 different factors go into the News Feed system to calculate the score of a News Feed story. Recommendations from the article include:

  • Make your posts timely and relevant
  • Build credibility and trust with your audience
  • Ask yourself, “Would people share this with their friends or recommend it to others?”
  • Think about, “Would my audience want to see this in their News Feeds?”

(source: Facebook, August 2013)

Content signals

  • Like-baiting signal: Words such as “like, comment, or share”
  • Like-baiting signal: Unusual engagement patterns
  • Meme content signal: Negative Feedback categorized as “meme content”
  • Meme content signal: Visual analysis of overlayed text on image

From Social Bakers, these factors include some of the proven and theoretical ways that the Facebook artificial intelligence works to gauge the quality of a News Feed post. The above factors would lead to a post receiving lower visibility in the News Feed (like-baiting and meme content are considered low-quality). The below factors for original content would lead to a post receiving higher priority in the News Feed.

  • Original content signal: Has image/video existed in Open Graph before?
  • Original content signal:  Has this link been posted before?

(source: Social Bakers, May 2014)

Old posts stand a good chance of being seen.

imrs

The above chart comes from an analysis by the Washington Post’s Tim Herrera of his personal News Feed. He tracked and charted over 3,200 posts on a single day, posts that came from Facebook friends and pages he has liked. He ended up seeing nearly as many old posts as new posts—and missed out on a huge number of other new posts from friends and pages.

The takeaway: Old content has a longer shelf life in the News Feed than we may think.

(source: Washington Post, August 2014)

Affinity can impact the visibility of a post.

One of the factors the Facebook News Feed algorithm considers is affinity–that is, how much of a connection you have with each fan. If you can get them liking, commenting on, and sharing more content, you demonstrate a greater affinity and they will see more of your future content.

(source: Inc, October 2014)

Lower fan engagement may lead to bundled posts.

Screen Shot 2014-11-06 at 9.11.55 PM

Travis Bernard of TechCrunch noticed bundling of a page’s posts in the News Feed. The explanation:

 Whether or not the stories collapse into a single update is completely dependent on user behavior. If you’re engaging with a page’s posts on a consistent basis, the stories will not collapse. If you have not been engaging with the page’s posts within the News Feed on a regular basis, the stories will likely collapse for you. The difference is whether you are a passive fan or a die-hard fan.

(source: TechCrunch: November 2014)

Useful resources

Here’s a must-see video about the quality of your Facebook page’s fans and how this might impact the engagement on your posts and, therefore, the visibility and reach of your content.

Mark Zuckerberg addressed the topic of declining Facebook reach in a Q&A held on November 6. The discussion begins at the 16-minute mark of the below video.

Could you help us make this resource more complete?

We’d love your help in tracking any changes and factors to the Facebook News Feed so that this post can be as complete as possible.

Is there anything that we’ve missed?

Is there any news that came out recently that we should add?

Let us know by leaving a comment on this post or emailing us at hello@bufferapp.com. We’ll be happy to pass along a hat tip in the post for any and all good leads.

We hope this resource comes in handy for you as you navigate your Facebook marketing strategy. Let us know how things go, and if there’s anything we can do to improve the way we help.

Image sources: Noun Project, Blurgrounds, PlaceIt

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Written by Kevan Lee

Content crafter at Buffer. You can find me online, tweeting about my writing process, or at home, second-guessing football coaches. Live simply, give generously, beat cancer.

  • Michéal Breslin

    We’ve noticed sharing content from “higher authoritative pages” is more likely to get seen in your followers news feeds. We see our own posts with the same amount of engagement (likes etc.) that just don’t get the same impressions as sharing a post from a high authoritative page. Has anyone seen this?

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Hi Michéal! Very interesting point! I’ve not quite noticed this yet with Buffer. Curious, are you measuring page authority with PageRank or another stat? Or maybe just popular sentiment? Seems like an interesting one to test!

      • Michéal Breslin

        No not through PageRank but I think Facebook may have a similar thing on how they rank sites. For instance we shared a piece of content from the NY times last week which got a similar amount of likes as a piece of our own content however the impressions were over 3 times what we received and thus got 3 times more clicks. The click through rates for our content was higher also at 6.4% and the NY times piece was 4.8%. Very interested to know more!

        • Jen Gresham

          I have definitely noticed the same thing. I’m not sure if it matters if it comes from a high authority Page or not, or simply that shared links get more airplay.

      • Miguel-11

        Hello, I would like my fan-page get displayed these five stars used to measure quality of content, but I have no physical business attached to page, no physical address and nothing to sell, just to promote my services on internet. Why FB doesn´t allow users feedback for all fan-pages ? . Is there some way of getting stars-meter even lacking physical store attached to page?

    • http://brilliantbusinessmoms.com Sarah & Beth Anne

      Micheal, I think you’re exactly right. Holly Homer of quirkymomma.com and Crystal Paine of MoneySavingMom.com both ascribe to this theory, and make sharing popular posts from other pages that have excellent enagagement one of their main Facebook strategies.

      Crystal actually shared what’s working for her on Facebook in a recent podcast episode with us. brilliantbusinessmoms.com/52

      You can see the engagement rate of other pages by clicking their “500,000 likes” button or whatever you want to call it, and from there it tells you how many people are “Talking about this” You want the number of people talking about it to be 30-50% at least, I think, whereas a lowly little page like ours probably only has 10% of fans “talking about this”

      Kevan, this is an excellent resource. Thank you so much for this! I agree that tagging other pages bumps up your post in the News Feed. We’ve seen this happen many times as we tag the person we interviewed for a podcast episode.

      It’s also true that people who have liked or commented on a post of yours in the past are more likely to see all of your posts show up in their news feed. We consistently see the same people liking and commenting. And, as a user on my end, I consistently see only a handful of status updates of pages I like, and it’s always based on which ones I like, comment, and engage with.

      Thanks again, Kevan!

      ~ Beth Anne

    • Allison Arcos

      I was hesitant to post about this because I didn’t want Facebook to notice, but when we share content from another page (photos or videos), it results in a significant boost in organic reach. This post: https://www.facebook.com/redbarninc/posts/799005460121079 got an organic reach of over 19,000 fans with only 300 likes/25 comments. Timeline contests we run with similar engagement will only reach about half that amount unless we advertise. I’ve noticed a similar effect with photos although the lift isn’t as dramatic.

    • http://bebrainfit.com Deane Alban

      Yes, I’ve noticed this, too. It’s frustrating because I’d rather share my own content but get more reach when I share posts from higher authority sites. This seems to contradict that Facebook doesn’t want to see frequently shared content. If I share something from one of the top sites in my niche, I’m pretty sure I’m not the only one doing it!

  • http://whitbeckweb.com Jon Whitbeck

    Great post! I’ve read that sharing images that include too much text can affect whether a post is shown or not. Apparently images with too much skin (that are totally “general audience”) can also lead to a post being viewed negatively by Facebook.
    I wonder if cross Page activity (commenting on other Pages as your Page, for example) could impact the visibility of your Page’s posts. Of course, I’m referring to quality commenting.
    Sharing authoritative Page posts on your own Page would seem more likely to shown by Facebook, but I have no experience to support that.
    Kevin, I love your articles. I don’t know how you manage to write SO many thoroughly informative posts. I have a question. Is it possible to recognize, reward, thank folks that share your Page posts with their friends? I’d like to let followers know that I value that, but I don’t know how to do so. Thoughts?

  • http://becoming95.blogspot.com Abby Anfinson

    I’ve been analyzing my facebook’s page performance very closely (my page has over 30k fans) and the key to getting posts shown to more people has been dependent on how many clicks a post has been getting. I know this because I’ve been posting Instagram pictures onto my facebook page. Those receive 200+ likes and 40 “clicks” but they are only shown to 1k people or fewer. A few days ago I posted a photo with a recipe and it received 109 likes and 780 “clicks.” This post was shown to 8.1k people. HUGE difference. If you can get people to click on your link that will get it in the newsfeed. This has been happening consistently. It’s all about the CLICKS.

    • Guest

      I always assumed the added bump of Instagram photos (which I’ve noticed as well) was because Facebook has a stake in Instagram and would want you to continue to use it.

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      This makes a ton of sense, Abby! So interesting that you have some numbers to back up this experience. 🙂 Thanks for sharing!

    • http://menoob.com menoob

      I think it’s a combination of engagement (likes, comments, shares) and clicks. I’ve seen this from my own data. The problem with clicks, they don’t create stories that can be seen by non-fans. If you want more clicks, a video post will usually give you that.

    • http://www.carloisles.com/ Carlo Isles

      I think it all boils down to the content of your post. Your photo would get good engagement but a recipe post is something helpful to others especially if it has an enticing photo that would make you crave and want to try it.

      Can you share us these 2 posts? This would be really helpful to everybody around the globe so we can gain new insights! 🙂

  • adremja

    That’s the reason I still use old RSS/Atom.

    However I wondering if they have method to avoid filter bubble http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filter_bubble

  • Pam

    Loved this article and the information given is dead on correct. I tried using the FB promoting, analyzed the performance, as well as clicks and realized that it was a total scam. I felt they were a bit deceptive in selling their Service of ‘Promoting’ your page right from the start. It was not truly clarified as to what kind of costs would be involved, or how these ‘Likes’ or ‘Clicks’ were to be acquired . When I received the first bill and it was over $250.00 for 1 month I was totally shocked, I had NO clue that it would cost any where close to this amount of money. Then on top of it, not to produce any kind of revenue whatsoever, seriously?. Yes I had tons of ‘Likes’ and ‘Clicks’ but that means nothing to me if it doesn’t convert into dollars in Sales. I immediately canceled any further promoting and paid the initial bill. However, FB continued to promote my page without my permission, and they are now trying to collect another $250.00 plus even though I had canceled the promoting. I initially responded to them stating that I had canceled the campaign, and shared my opinion that Service was and is a scam. I also let them know that it was definitely not fully disclosed as to the costs involved when I was considering the Service. Now they continue sending notices and/or post on my page that I owe money. At this point, I am just ignoring them because they are either to stupid to go back and see that I canceled, or perhaps they think that I will pay it without questioning. Who knows but I do know this, I refuse to pay for something that I canceled in the manner in which they instructed. As well as advising them exactly what I thought of their so called ‘Promoting’.

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Thanks for the comment, Pam! Very sorry this. Sounds really frustrating! I’d love to think that understanding the Facebook News Feed could help with some increases in organic traffic and reach, too!

  • http://thebuzzfactoree.com/ Gail Kent

    How do you get the clicks if you can’t get it shown? That’s the thing …

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Ah, great one, Gail! That’s a big one!

      If you don’t mind my sharing a theory, I wonder if Facebook takes into consideration the rate of clickthrus – so if you get 5 people to click on your post and it is shown to 50 people, you have a 10% conversion rate. Then, maybe Facebook will show your next post to 150 people, and if your clickthru rate stays good, your following posts will continue to see more and more reach. Does that idea make sense? My gut is that Facebook might look at the clickthrough rate more than it would the gross number of clicks on a post. Again, this is all just speculation, though! Would love to hear what your experience has been. 🙂

      • http://thebuzzfactoree.com/ Gail Kent

        So what I hear you saying is that Facebook “remembers” the history from one post to the next from the same source. I didn’t realize that. I thought the value of each status update stood on its own two feet. I guess that makes sense. I have noticed that when I post a link from a well-known blogger, it gets more views than when I post a link to my own blog.

        • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

          Right, Gail! That’s my theory at least!

  • http://www.stephenanfield.com/ Stephen

    First, great post Kevan!

    Would you happen to know if liking your own post (whether as a page or individual) has a positive impact? A few of my friends do it, and it’s quite possibly one of the most annoying things I see people do. I’ve been telling them it has no impact, but I’d love to have concrete evidence.

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Great question, Stephen! I’ve yet to see any concrete evidence for this, but I’ll certainly keep my eye out. I think my intuition might be that liking your own content probably doesn’t have much impact on reach?

      • http://www.stephenanfield.com/ Stephen

        I wouldn’t think so either. A few “friends” do it, and it’s the most annoying thing ever. Hahaha.

      • http://www.jermaineyoung.com Jermaine Young

        I did a little research and “liking” my own posts have actually thrown it back into the newsfeed as though it was newly posted. It’s still based on the above factors but if it was good content and posted at a bad time there is a chance to save it if you like it and engage with the new interactors.

    • Bek

      I agree, liking your own post is annoying. And tacky. I don’t have a business page (yet), but as a fan/consumer, if I see that a business has liked their own post I immediately unlike them.

      • http://www.stephenanfield.com/ Stephen

        Interesting! I wonder if brands would stop if they knew fans “unliked” the page.

      • http://www.jermaineyoung.com Jermaine Young

        There is a strategy to “liking” your own post. I detailed it in the comment above. It is possible to wake up a dormant post with this technique if done correctly.

    • http://www.jermaineyoung.com Jermaine Young

      Well. I’ve discovered that “liking” your own post could be a sneaky way to reignite engagement on a dormant post since facebook is judging likes differently. I tried this a week ago on a post from 2010 and within 30 minutes (the average I’ve measured to get feedback on whether your post is being shown in the newsfeed) I began receiving new engagement by way of likes, comments, and shares as though I just posted the status that day.

      If you don’t like “liking” your own post this tip also works with liking comments within the post from others. This works especially well if you’ve had your page since before Facebook allowed reply “likes” and comments.

      People don’t often look at the date but I thought this was a very cool way to create evergreen Facebook posts or reintroduce relevant subjects into the newsfeed.

      Feel free to try it and let me know if it works for you as well.

      • http://www.stephenanfield.com/ Stephen

        I’m just now seeing this. My apologies for the delay. This is great advice!

  • http://www.theworldofdeej.com D.J.

    Curious, did anyone else notice an overnight change in the length (shorter) of text per line on posts? All of my scheduled posts are suddenly 2 or 3 lines longer on mobile and would possibly trip the dreaded “See More” button..

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Oh, good catch DJ! I haven’t quite noticed this one yet, but I’ll definitely look for it going forward. Thanks for the tip!

    • http://www.journeysofthezoo.com/ Journeysof TheZoo

      Clearly I need to read more articles on how to generate Facebook engagement because I’d heard that post length (characters) did NOT effect algorithm factors. Can you confirm either way.

      Any comments on using hashtags? I heard that Pinterest was going to start penalizing people that did. Wondering if Facebook will/does too.

      Great article and comments. Thanks.

      Besos, Sarah

  • http://twitter.com/ramin Ramin

    Thanks for the awesome info! Even though we’re not on top of our Facebook game, we’ve noticed an easy win is to upload videos to Facebook, like you mentioned in this post, rather than linking to an external blog post with video, or youtube video.

    We used to just auto-post new blog posts via HubSpot into our Facebook page.

    With the last two posts, we the video of each blog post into Facebook, just added a text link (+ “Learn more” button at the end of the video that linked to the blog post).

    Kind of early to say, but we’re seeing much higher reach in Facebook (somewhere between 5x to 10x). The fact that we have a tiny FB audience (<500 page likes) probably amplifies the effect.

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Awesome to hear, Ramin! That’s great! I may borrow this advice for some of my own testing, too! 🙂

    • Jen Gresham

      Do you have a problem with video quality when you upload directly to Facebook? I found that Facebook defaults to standard definition unless someone clicks on the video. Really annoying and it’s what has kept me from uploading more videos.

      • http://twitter.com/ramin Ramin

        Yes, the video quality is lower when I upload directly to Facebook. That said, we’ve got mostly simple talking head videos, so for it’s not that much of a problem, and the wider reach does outweigh the lost quality.
        For high quality videos, you could upload like the first 15 seconds of the video, and then add Facebook’s ‘Watch More’ call to action button at the end and link directly to the video, and write: for the full video in HD quality, click this link. 🙂

  • http://wpplugindirectory.org/ Towhidul Islam

    Reaching fans through Facebook is getting quite hard. After Copyblogger & Groove deleted their Facebook Page it shows how redundant Facebook can be in terms of your time and effort.

    By the way excellent post with lots of information. Hopefully it won’t that hard anymore (y)

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Thanks! Very interesting to see what Copyblogger and Groove have done. 🙂

  • Bryce Curran

    soò this is my problem……. i run a photography page but the only time i have a good amount of interaction is when I share the rugby score….. and my original pictures get hardly any interaction… (page only has 50 likes atm) how do i up my likers base and interaction?

  • trentluv

    There are no marketing secrets to the Facebook algorithm worth pursuing. Your audience must truly like the content you are posting. If you wouldn’t like seeing what you post, your audience probably won’t either. To say that “getting more likes and shares” boosts your FB presence is true, but not extremely helpful, because it doesn’t explain what a SMM needs to do in order to get those likes or shares. Bottom line? Don’t bother unless you would actually interact with what you are posting. If it doesn’t come from the heart, Facebook will know.

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Great point on the importance of quality with posts!

  • IH

    It’s not mentioned here, but Facebook also considers the prior reach: Lets say your previous post/posts have been with low reach and now you come up with this great post, but the reach remains low, because the algorithm is blocking it, in fear that it might not interest/engage the users. Therefore, I let each post enough time to have a maximum reach possible and I try to avoid posting random content when I’m not sure my fans will absolutely love it.

    • IH

      This also keeps the average reach high and then I can guarantee that my next post will get at least similar reach then previous.

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Sounds like a super strategy! Thanks for sharing. 🙂

  • http://www.canadawebservices.com/ Steve

    Good post on Facebook algorithms, They are keep on making changes and updating the news feed factors like google is doing. So I believe unique, well written comments article may lead to rank your fb posts high in the news feed.

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Thanks for this, Steve! Great to hear your thoughts on the topic. Content is king! This seems to be a great one to keep in mind. 🙂

  • http://www.travisbernard.com/ Travis Bernard

    Hi – thanks for including my article about “bundling” posts in your recap. The logic for how the bundling occurs is actually slightly different than I originally reported. It has nothing to do with a user being passive vs die-hard. Updated info here: http://techcrunch.com/2014/11/06/why-are-my-facebook-pages-posts-getting-bundled-together/

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Ah, thanks so much Travis! I really appreciate your following up here. Will give the post a read and update our article!

      • http://www.travisbernard.com/ Travis Bernard

        Sure, no problem. And thanks for reading TechCrunch!

  • http://www.turnleaf.be Paul Van Cotthem

    Does posting to Facebook via Buffer, instead of directly, result in lower ‘EdgeRank’, so less views by friends?

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Hi Paul! That’s a really great question. I’m afraid I don’t have a definitive answer, although I will say that we’ve been given no reason to think that posting from Buffer affects the visibility of posts. It’s possible that this plays a part in the News Feed algorithm, but I’ve yet to see any news saying as much. From what I can tell (and what I’ve experienced), posting from Buffer has had no ill effects!

      • Peter Kirwan

        this is a question that hung around for a long time (with third party apps in general) but pretty sure Facebook came out at some point in last 6 months and said there’s no penalty for using third party apps like Buffer. Prior to that there had been conflicting views I think though Hootsuite offered an analysis that suggested there was no penalty. So yeah short answer is you should be fine I reckon.

  • janetgershensiegel

    It’s all about clicks, likes, shares, and comments. Everything that happens to your content is generating a message. FB mainly weighs those messages, deciding which are better as it sorts all of the things that fly by our news feeds. A fast click will weigh this much, liking weighs less, etc. Certainly sharing not only reaches more people but also weighs more as it is a much more intentional activity.

    I really love Abby Anfinson’s analysis – great concrete numbers.

    PS Great post, Kevan. This is one that I’ll come back to again and again. Everybody, it seems, has this issue. My biggest takeaway from this is to continue to ignore the siren song of FB trying to sell me advertising (at least for now). It makes more sense to make good content and get it out there.

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      “Make good content and get it out there.” That’s a great motto, Janet!

      • janetgershensiegel

        Thank you! I’ll be here all week. 😉

  • Vanessa VanAlstyne

    Posts with unusual engagement patters (a like-baiting signal)
    ^^^Think you have a type-o there, bro. Patters = Patterns ?

    I’m including a photo of a fat squirrel so you don’t feel bad:

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Thanks for catching that typo! Love the squirrel. 🙂

  • Jen Gresham

    Kevan, can you explain what “meme-like” posts are? They sound like the images with inspirational quotes on them, which you see *everywhere* so I think I must be misunderstanding what’s actually being penalized.

    • Kellie McGarry

      following this as I am confused too.

      • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

        Great question, Jen and Kellie! The way I understand memes in this instance is that they’re the popular pictures/text images that are kind of like in-jokes around the Internet. There’s a great list of them here: http://knowyourmeme.com/memes. I believe that inspirational quotes would fall outside of memes!

  • http://dawlf.in/ Andrew Wilkins

    We’ve used Share-As-Image with many of our clients as a quick way to add imagery to content (IE: Picture of that days’ special with text overlay). So Facebook likely recognizes this as a meme?

    • Peter Kirwan

      yeah i was saying we’ve had huge success with this so was surprised to see it on the ‘bad’ list

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Great one, Andrew! My gut is that Facebook might aim for more meme-specific content (see here: http://knowyourmeme.com/memes), some of the popular text-over-image pictures and in-jokes that tend to circulate online.

  • Michelle

    This is what stands out for me:
    Posts that are classified as memes by Facebook’s visual analysis of overlayed text on image
    Am I reading this correctly in that if a brand page adds a logo or a simple ‘Merry Christmas’ text over an image this will be classed as a ‘meme’ and be compromised by the algorithm?

    Would be interested in others thoughts on this.

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Great one, Michelle! I’m thinking that memes in this case are checked against some of the popular memes out there (http://knowyourmeme.com/memes) and might not penalize text-over-images for inspirational quotes, timely greetings/holiday notes, etc. That’s my instinct on the topic. Happy to keep digging in on this one!

  • adwordslessons

    It is widely thrown around in the marketing community that posting to via 3rd party apps (of which group Buffer belongs to) as opposed to posting directly from FB results in a lower organic reach score. Don’t know if there is any evidence to back this one up, but it is kind of strange that it was ignored in this article (or maybe not?).

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Thanks for the insight here! I’ll definitely keep an ear to the ground on this one and see if I can turn up some evidence. Might warrant some more testing on my end as well!

  • Andrew Coy

    Is there any reason one’s feed is quite different between desktop and mobile even at the exact same time?

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Great question, Andrew! I’ve noticed similar differences in some of the Google services. My guess is that Facebook might expect you’d be interested in slightly different content when viewing from a desktop versus a mobile – e.g., content for when you’re sitting down vs. when you’re on the go. Totally a stab in the dark on that one! Would love to know any theories you might have as well!

      • Andrew Coy

        Thanks for the reply back — I don’t have any theories just yet but will circle back if I see things or hear of any reasons why it is this way! Great article.

  • raphaelhunold

    Very important : do not use shortlink as a link snippet !
    Shortlink are redirecting user to the final url but Facebook algo think that this content is bad because people don’t stay on these url. Consequence : the reach is verry bad ! So if you use Buffer ton manage post on your Facebook page, go to the setting “Link shortening” of your Facebook page and select “no shortening”.

    • http://www.marketingwithmojo.com Melody Bays Davis

      Great tip! Thanks for sharing!

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Thanks, Raphael! That’s such great advice!

  • Matt

    Me personally I am going to stop posting to facebook. I have about 45k fans and I only reach about 5% of them now on a good day! I will be focusing in on building my G+ account and my YouTube is starting to take off:) The simple truth is Facebook will now make us pay for every single post or watch our page burn. Sadly that is going to do one thing, it is going to give huge corporations a foothold in monopolizing yet is seven on digital media as well. I am very frustrated with them but I am at a point now where my life is more important to me then all of the keeping up I’m trying to reach my fans.

    • Matt
      • Matt

        I am already starting to post less. Honestly, it has been a very heartbreaking for me but Facebook does not care I’m sure no one else does either. I sure am happy making videos for YouTube and I’m about to clear 10,000 subscribers on one channel:)

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Hi Matt! Sorry to hear that Facebook isn’t working out, and I’m wishing you the best on G+ and YouTube! Glad to hear things are taking off there for you!

  • Peter Kirwan

    Great post overall but very surprised at the claim that images overlayed with text are punished. As recent as September 10th I’ve had huge success with these. Is this a very recent change? Maybe it helps that the stuff we are putting up isn’t anything to do with any meme. We just take a photo of an athlete and then print some stats about the athlete over it. e.g. https://www.facebook.com/GreatVeganAthletes/photos/a.505010006198658.122366.479061812126811/793192850713704/?type=1

    • http://www.marketingwithmojo.com Melody Bays Davis

      Great tip! Thanks for sharing this one!

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Great one, Peter! I think you’re exactly right. My gut would be that the example you shared here strays a bit from “meme” territory so Facebook likely doesn’t penalize!

  • Bek

    Great article! Facebook amazes me, Buffer keeps me in the loop. Love your tagline.

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Thanks so much, Bek!

  • http://www.bigtopfamily.com Ashley BigTopFamily

    Hi, this was eye-opening for me, thank you. I’m not sure if anyone else has already asked this. I’m a blogger, and I’ve been putting my links in the comments after introducing my blog post in a status update. Someone told me today that that is the WORST possible thing to do. Is that true? In terms of pecking order, I should put them in a status update or in a photo caption? Help. Thanks!

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Hi Ashley! Great question. My instinct would be to share the blogpost url in the status update. Facebook will recognize the link and style it appropriately. You can still intro the blogpost as well in the update. Hopefully this makes sense. I’d love to know if this works for you!

      • http://www.bigtopfamily.com Ashley BigTopFamily

        That is how I was doing them originally; then changed because the word on the street was that they wouldn’t get seen. I’ll go back to doing it this way and let you know if I see any improvement in reach. Thanks so much!

  • Aristeidis Kypriotis

    This is possibly slightly out of topic, bit does anyone know how a prolonged page inactivity might affect post visibility.

    For example, in the case of a facebook page that has been inactive for, say, 4+ months. What happens if after this period of idleness you start posting in it?
    Intuitively , I suppose posts will get a very very low visibility and performance.

    Anyone has any experience or data to verify (or falsify) my assumption?

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Great question, Aristeidis! I’ve not heard much about this one, but I’ll definitely keep an eye out for anything on the topic!

  • IzaBella

    My question regarding the shorten link:

    Let’s say there was a post with a pic that in the next month will be that and that kind of program availabilities and then once a week I am posting a new photo with a reminder that in few days will be the program and the shorten link shows the way to that FB album where the original (1st) photo is uploaded with all the details.

    Than this on.fb.me/abcd shorten link from the view of Facebook algorithm is
    failed? ’cause in my mind is better to do this way than reposting the original
    content so for the „customers” doesn’t look like we need your money, we are
    starving. And let’s not forget that the link to your photo uploaded to FB is
    huge, optically seems embarrassing. But people are forgetting things, you need to remind them 😉

    P.S.: the reason why I had to do like this, there’s no impact from our fans when we created events. The information about the pograms within a picture made by us has lot more effects (likes, shares)

    And the other thing why I’m having question marks around my head.

    Facebook loves if you’re posting to their platform the videos, pictures. After this, does it makes any sense to make tabs with let’s say Instagram, your utube channel, Pinterest?

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Great question! Sorry I don’t quite have the answer for this one. I’ll see if I happen to spot any suggestions while I’m doing more research on the topic! 🙂

      • IzaBella

        Thank you very much for your reply! I’m always keeping the loop on your articles, so we’ll see, are there any suggestions 🙂

  • Paul W. Baker Sr.

    This makes a ton of sense, Abby! So interesting that you have some numbers to back up this experience. 🙂 Thanks for sharing!!

  • AnnMullen

    This explains why my FB boosted posts got thousands of views and next to no click throughs. Thanks for making FB a little more understandable, Kevan.

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Thanks, Ann! Happy to help shed some light here. Learning lots myself, too!

  • Omkar Joshi

    This is simply amazing stuff!
    We’ve been doing Social Media Campaigns for over 2 years now and even I got to learn some interesting things from this!
    Cheers Kevan! Great job!
    This one is going straight into the bookmarks!

  • FirefoxGuru

    Ah, shucks. I guess Memes are out. What about for dedicated meme Pages? They’ll get crippled…
    ‘Don’t do this: The algorithm is not too keen on …
    – Posts that receive negative feedback categorizes as “meme content”
    – Posts that are classified as memes by Facebook’s visual analysis of

  • deshantm

    In practice, we’ve noticed that facebook promotes posts that get comments with certain key words in them. For example, “Congratulations” as a comment influences facebook to show the story to more people.

  • Nikki Lear McClain

    As a small family owned business, the person who manages the company fb pages also oversee daily operations, payables, receivables & cleans the bathroom every other Friday. This wouldbe helpful if my payroll budget allowed for another salary on it!

  • Jason

    I have a page with over 800k fans and something that I have noticed is that when your weekly reach gets too high then your reach will subsequently suffer a massive hit. This has happened to me twice now, and a friend who owned a subsequent page.

    Basically what happened was that a video went viral on page page (in both instances) reaching 4.7 and 6.5 Million people. getting over 80,000 likes and 40,000 shares between them, this improved my other posts reach for a time but after a couple of days my post reach which i was getting on average per video, about 250,000-500,000, fell to 50,000-100,000 per video over night.

    This also happened to my other friend with a large facebook page, therefore to maintain a consistent facebook post reach sometimes a viral video is not the best thing, it seems like it gets you on facebooks ‘radar’ and they realize that you are getting good reach for free essentially, so they then subsequently cut the reach so that you pay more.

  • Peter Mayer

    Great article. I have one of those Facebook pages that basically posts only text-over-images for inspirational and life quotes and lyrics (for example: https://www.facebook.com/pictoquotes/photos/pb.1421206901474370.-2207520000.1417144505./1509408185987574/?type=3&theater ) and I don’t think that Facebook considers this page as a meme page.
    I don’t know how their algorithm can decide what is considered as meme and what is not.

    One thing that I realized that might be related to what is considered a meme and what is not is that when I advertise my PictoQuotes page with Facebook, they don’t allow my attached photo or even my page’s own cover photo (if used in the ad) have a lot of text.
    If I remember well text should be less than 20% of the whole ad. If it’s more they don’t approve the ad at all.

    They might use some similar system on text over images as well.

    Cheers

  • Peter Mayer

    Great article. I have one of those Facebook pages that basically posts only text-over-images for inspirational and life quotes and lyrics (for example: https://www.facebook.com/pictoquotes/photos/pb.1421206901474370.-2207520000.1417144505./1509408185987574/?type=3&theater ) and I don’t think that Facebook considers this page as a meme page.

    I don’t know how their algorithm can decide what is considered as meme and what is not.

    One thing that I realized that might be related to what is considered a meme and what is not is that when I advertise my PictoQuotes page with Facebook, they don’t allow my attached photo or even my page’s own cover photo (if used in the ad) have a lot of text.

    If I remember well text should be less than 20% of the whole ad. If it’s more they don’t approve the ad at all.

    They might use some similar system on text over images as well.

    Cheers

  • FirefoxGuru

    How about the frequency of posts, i.e. too many at once leads to exponentially decreased reach and one post in a while will have significantly higher initial barebones reach…

  • Alison Hoffman Stern

    Really good post. I need to read and reread this again because there is so much info in it. Here’s my question: I have a small jewelry business and often will share a new design between my business and personal pages. In fact, Etsy has a direct link to Facebook when a new item is posted. I could see that FB would not smile upon that, but could I post a new design FROM my Etsy site to my friends on my personal page only? Would they allow that and would they allow the reach to “Friends of Friends” or would I be better off changing my setting to “Friends?” And what is to become of apps like Shopify and Orange Twig and others?

    • http://courtneyseiter.com/ Courtney Seiter

      Hi Alison! Thanks so much for your kind words about this post! I have to say that I am not an expert at the intricacies of selling on Etsy, but it sounds to me like sharing your jewelry photos from Etsy to your personal account is a great strategy. 🙂 Friends of friends feels like a great choice here to widen your reach when your friends feel like giving a particular piece a share. This is what one of my friends does and I love seeing (and buying) her designs! Best of luck to you!

  • Mona

    If Facebook does not like memes then does it not like infographics as well?

  • Harajuku Boutique ♥

    Thank you yet again Kevan for such a comprehensive article. A number of my facebook page fans have expressed concern that they no longer see my posts in their newsfeed, so now I can understand why that may be. Thanks again!

  • carlmasure

    This is a prime example of how a company becomes very large, hires some boneheaded people, and as a result, makes terrible decisions. Most people are passive users of Facebook. They aren’t commenting and liking everything of interest. People are drawn to watching anonymously. It’s voyeurism. Hiding posts that people might like to see limits the voyeuristic opportunity. Total disengagement is the result.

  • http://www.fakeart.net dh

    How does FB treat posts from Buffer and Hootsuite in the newsfeed? I like the way Pinterest (I’m a visual artist) shows my work but have yet to get more than one or two likes on any of these posts and I have tried them all.

  • http://www.BeASpiritualBadass.com/ Amethyst Mahoney

    This is great info if you worry about your business page. If you’re really smart, however, you’ll create a group where people will see everything you post. Then you don’t have to worry about new algorithms every time Zuckerberg changes his underwear. Groups, people. It’s where it’s at.

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Great point, Amethyst! Groups seem like a great option as well!

  • Jeric

    I have been researching about the recent changes of Facebook News Feed and your ideas are very close to what I am looking for. Also, I have found this http://www.lionleaf.com/blog/what-do-you-think-of-the-new-look-facebook/ and it gives me the same result but yours are way straightforward. Just a quick question, how many clicks can a post, particularly for businesses, can get in an entire year?

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Hi there Jeric! Thank you for the comment and for sharing that link! Great question about clicks – I’m not sure I’ve heard of a limit to clicks, so I’d imagine that the yearly total can get quite high!

  • http://www.advancedtele.com ballparkbob

    I wish that Facebook would be “not too keen” on posts that share a person’s political views.

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Hi Bob! Thanks for the comment! I know Facebook is always experimenting with new things. That could be a direction they choose to go!

  • Eoin

    Great article Kevan. You have earned a new twitter follower! I look forward to reading more interesting content from you!

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Awesome! Thanks, Eoin!

  • Sheila de Guzman

    Hi there! Can you give an update on pages tagging pages for wider reach? This is a point of contention for a band I know: Band A has a show with a few big bands on the line up. So a member of Band A crafts a post to a link about the show, but simply lists the big bands in hopes that the post will show up in the newsfeeds of the bigger bands’ fans. We’ve already expressed this is bad etiquette, he could at least write something about the bands not just list them, but he’s convinced this is good strategy. AFAIK, I haven’t seen that tagging update roll out completely. I know some of the bigger bands have also (more appropriately) tagged Band A in their posts, but they haven’t shown up on my feed. I haven’t seen this for the brands I follow as well. Any insight here? I’d really appreciate this being settled. Thanks!

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Hi there Sheila!

      Thanks so much for the comment! This is a really great question. I’d love to share my perspective on this – not sure I have a “right” answer or not!

      From what I’ve learned, the strategy to tag other pages does help in surfacing your post in the News Feed of others’ fans. How much of an impact does this have in the algorithm? I’d imagine that it pales to the popularity (likes/comments) of a post as well as a handful of other factors. My advice would be to tag other pages where appropriate and where it fits in context. Tagging alone will not make up for a post that lacks interest/utility/value. 🙂

      Hope this all makes sense! I’d love to share more if it’d be helpful!

      • Sheila de Guzman

        Hi Kevan! Thank you for your quick reply! I completely agree and we ended up seeing what you said play out – posts that were liked/commented on got more reach than posts with tags that had no context. Their text-based announcement that they were playing at SXSW got many likes and comments which perpetuated itself. It ended up getting more reach/engagement than their paid post about their new music video. I tried explaining what happened, but not much you can say about working with complex algorithm! Do you have any recommended articles for proper social etiquette for bands? I show them articles small businesses, but they can’t seem to get past that; bands and businesses are supposedly different. Thanks again, Kevan, and I’ll be sure to keep an eye out for your social advice! -Sheila

  • Steven Andri

    Good post on Facebook algorithms, They are keep on making changes and updating the news feed factors like google is doing. So I believe unique, well written comments article may lead to rank your fb posts high in the news feed.

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  • Miguel-11

    Congratulations, nice and clear explanations.

    Now I have a question about “dislikes” on fan-page I can´t figure how to solve. Starting from 22 or 23 February lot of people began to “dislike” my fan-page , and although “likes” continues same rate (some 25 by day, no ads so I think “organic”), the qtty of dislikes now is higher than likes, so net followers are decreasing. Previously “dislikes” were at 3-5 day rate.

    I can´t figure what could be reason for this behavior, some FB algorithm change?, some post of mine which people didn´t like?. I traced back my posts until those days and could not find any picture or comments what could molest my fans.

    is there any tool to analyze these problems?

    Thanks very much.

    • Don

      Hi
      I’m also experiencing bigger than normal dislikes in my fan page.
      Not sure why… would also like to hear anyone insights.
      Tnx in advance

      • Miguel-11

        Hi, I think FB at last is giving some explanation. Yesterday when checking “likes” statistics and graphs I noticed a tiny new msg saying something like “FB is now removing all likes from deactivated FB accounts, so to display accurate info about likes” . I think they are processing task a little piece every day instead just one big update.

  • Laurie KaSarr Browne

    Why don’t any of my ‘liked pages’ appear in my newsfeed anymore? I’ve only just realized that they are all over in this new (to me) pages feed tab on the left instead. What’s the point of liking a page if it’s not going to be in my newsfeed? Defeats the whole purpose 🙁

  • http://joandempsey.com/ Joan Dempsey

    Just a note to say thanks to Kevan and Buffer for keeping this updated – I check in periodically and truly appreciate the information. Keep it coming, and thanks!

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  • http://joandempsey.com/ Joan Dempsey

    Another tip – I recently tried to boost a post that included the attached photo and got a warning that the post had not been approved because there was “too much text” in the image. I guess they’re trying to weed out photos posing as advertisements. Had to do a new post with a different image to get them to accept it. Sigh.

  • Brega

    I have a age that started out a a page just for fun about a geographic area. When Facebook changed its policies so that this was frowned upon I changed the name of the page to reflect that the page was still about that geographic area but not representing itself as the official page for that area (it started out a a page about a park).

    The page has more than 100,000 fans.

    I and some friends have started a nonprofit advocacy organization with the same name as the page and all of the information on the page, including the the website the page links to, clearly communicates that the page is the page of this nonprofit.
    Despite all of this the page is being penalized.
    It is being kept from appearing in search and is not being suggested as a page to like on Facebook.
    These are actions Facebook takes when a page is not in compliance with its terms of service for pages.
    But my page clearly is in compliance and Facebook is not penalizing teh page of our nonprofit organization.

    A page of our size that has our weekly post reach or engagement should be receiving close to several hundred to a couple of thousand new likes per week but we are lucky if we break 200.

    Doesn’t Facebook always say it wants to help make the world a better place by connecting people?

    Our page, the awareness it has raised, and the nonprofit it has led to should be a Facebook success story but instead they are punishing our page.

    We have done everything we can to stay in compliance with Facebook’s terms and have sent them multiple messages but are getting no results.

    What an we do?

    We are contemplating having a lawyer send them a letter with copies of the paperwork showing that we are an incorporated nonprofit and that we have trademarked our name.

    Our nonprofits page seems like it is being punished for a short period of time it was not in compliance with Facebook terms years ago.

    Back when our page had the same name as the title of the public park it was about the park complained to Facebook which was part of the reason that we changed the name and information of the page so it no longer appeared as if it was the page for the park. Are we still being punished for a complaint made us against us years ago?

  • http://doubtproof.wordpress.com riz

    Thank you so much for this compilation of updates! Simply fabulous.

    I think there’s a typo though that says November 2015 instead of 2014 but right below it says November 2014 so it’s not that misleading. 🙂

    • http://blog.bufferapp.com Kevan

      Hi Riz! Thanks for the comment! Ha, yes I got a full year ahead of myself there, really appreciate your spotting that. 🙂

  • Peter Lipentine

    Loved this article and the information given is dead on correct. I tried using the FB promoting, analyzed the performance, as well as clicks and realized that it was a total scam. Element FX Hacks

  • http://www.jermaineyoung.com Jermaine Young

    Does anyone know if is there any truth that posting statuses about Facebook gets more reach? Also, is there a way to get better engagement with gifs on profile pages (this seems to be the exception to the posted image and link post rule)?

  • http://menoob.com menoob

    Are you still updating this list? Thanks.

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